Saturday, September 7, 2019

Faces and Frames

What is it like to paint a face in a frame?
Do you start with the head, or is that the same?
How is it done, how does it work,
to capture an essence, the smallest of quirks?

Can you paint a laugh, a tear or a sigh?
I don't know for sure, though many have tried...
Mona Lisa is one; a painting which irks.
We really don't know - is that a smile, or a smirk?

Great critics argue that point to this day,
I have the answer, I'll put it this way;
Some say, "No difference", but I disagree;
she's smirking at you, but she's smiling with me.....

(Ruminating on my inability to draw....)

Friday, August 30, 2019

Light

They look benign
there by the sink.
Temporarily mine,
they make me think.

These candlesticks
Might soon be gone,
but a light, once lit;
shines on and on.

August 30, 2019
Stonecroft

The duality of all things.The fleeting vs. the permanent.

Sunday, August 25, 2019

Por Mon Fille (For My Daughter)

If I could be your Jesus,
I would take your pain.
I'd stand the cross and the nails
so your tears won't fall like rain.

I'd gladly wear the Crown of Thorns;
take all the jeers and tauntings.
I'd do anything I could
to keep you from your hauntings.

All the sins upon my back
would be mine to suffer.
I'd gladly be your Jesus.
I'd gladly be that buffer......

I did not know the artist name and asked my friends on Facebook. Maryann Held nailed it in less than a minute after I posted it. Here is her reply to my plea for help...... Thanks, Maryann!

"Peter Paul Rubens, Hercules’ Dog Discovers Purple Dye, c.1636 Musée Bonnat-Helleu

Hercules’ dog largely contributed to art history as it had discovered purple dye. According to the legend, while running on the beach the dog bit a sea snail and dyed his mouth purple. Clever boy.  Hope this helps."

Saturday, August 24, 2019

Nana and My Dream



I used to have nightmares of my dad screaming at me, close up drill sergeant style, which he used to do, veins in his neck bulging out. Haven't had them in years.

The other week he was in one, about to go off on me, and Nana; who rarely is in my dreams at all; was hovering there, right next to him, and told him; just by her presence,  to leave me alone! 😁 What a great dream!

She was there several times in real life when he did that, though never directly interfered. This was around 1964 and 65. I was 10-11years old at the time.

I had gone grocery shopping, one of my many chores because Mom was always sick or in hospital etc. This particular day Nana and Aunts Gloria and Gladys took me to the bungalow at Breezy Point and when Nana took me upstairs at about 10 PM my dad was waiting, fuming!

In my haste to leave that day I had left out a package of bologna so it was no good anymore. He hit the roof and wouldn't stop yelling, screaming.....

Nana wouldn't leave and he finally calmed down. Gloria was waiting downstairs for her and kept ringing the intercom, wondering what was taking so long.

Nana; what a saint she was and still is. You know at one point I was forbidden to go see her! Now, imagine not being allowed to see your own grandmother! She was only 15 streets away at 2807 Kings Hwy. We were at 1310 Ave R. So, it was only about 1 mile.

I used to take my bike and visit her and had to lie about where I'd been. I didn't want to put this on the wall at first and wrote it as an IM to cousin Patsy, but decided to share it anyway.

They say when you speak lovingly of the departed they live forever. Kind of like the Saints. Nana doesn't need to be Canonized by anyone or thing. I did that long ago in my heart.

Photo is cropped from my wedding album. Aunt Gloria made sure she was there for my wedding....

Monday, August 5, 2019

Earth from Space

Saturn has its' many rings
We both share the same sun.
And Jupiter has its' many moons
While poor old Earth has only one.

Now, Mars might look good in red,
And Venus has its' clouds.
But when I see the Earth from space,
It makes me very proud.

We've got greens and blues and reds.
It's colorful, what we are.
So, why at night when I go to bed,
Do I wish upon a Star?

Thursday, July 25, 2019

The Torch


 Every day they say they've got him,
but next day he's slipped their grasp.
And you wonder how it happened,
how on earth did he get past?

His hair is like the helmet
some super heroes wore,
and the words escaping from his lips
are thoughts ne'er thought before.

But each night they get together
in their dark and smoky rooms,
and as the night gives way to dawn,
once again they plot his doom.

First there were the Russians-
which somehow didn't pan out-
then they got a stripper
and claimed they'd caught the lout!

Then there was the Playmate-
and there also was a whore-
why, they heaped on so much scandal
that the public soon got bored.

Then they turned upon themselves,
so they'd be squeaky clean.
And even cleaned up Hollywood-
In a rare, accidental scene!

They waited for the Big Blue Wave,
the one which never came.
And then went after his wife and kid-
deeming them to be fair game.

Round and round in circles
the people all were lead.
And slowly, but very surely,
they grew sick of heart and head.

So, the moral of the story,
and this won't take long at all -
The more you try to topple him
the less likely he will fall.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Original Sin and the US Constitution?

Nothing rankles me more than the Original Sin argument about the United States and the Constitution. That we were founded upon Slavery. Quite the opposite is true. We were founded as a nation based on the stated notion that protection for slavery would only last until 1807, and further, that there could be no Amendment to change that date or goal. Read it. Article 1 Section 9.

So, in the very first Article of the US Constitution there is not only an acknowledgment of the evils of slavery, which was part of the system handed down to us by Britain, there is also a stated date for the cessation of importation of more slaves. This was the only way to get the 13 colonies to agree on the Constitution. And, yes, after 1807 we did have the misguided Missouri Compromise and the Kansas-Nebraska Act. I say misguided because attempting to compromise with something like slavery is just that; at the very least.

But by 1861 it all came to a head, as it was bound to, and 685,000 Americans, North and South, died to finally end slavery. Was it instantaneously successful? Of course not. But, the point is that we kept hammering it until it took proper shape and today we live in a world which has more slaves than we, as a nation, ever held in bondage.

Is there still work to do? "In order to form a more perfect Union" there always will be. But Original Sin? Sorry, you'll have to peddle that line elsewhere.....

Saturday, July 6, 2019

The Birds at River Oaks Drive

The birds here at my new house at first might look the same,
rats with wings, fleeting things, although not quite so tame.
They may fly, sing, soar and squawk and even sound the same,
But the birds back at the old place, put these new ones to shame.

Yes, they may be more colorful, plentiful and varied.
But I'd trade these yellow finches for the way the robin carried
her dignity, her poise, her noise, the way she never tarried;
building a nest on my back porch for the lover she had married.    

These new birds live in the woods and come soaring down for seed.
They play and fuss and sometimes fight, all to feed their greed.
The blue birds chase the cardinals who have gathered here to feed,
They chase them off but can't eat now, with the finches filling their needs.

They remind me of corporate raiders, and the plots they often hatch,
But instead of penthouse suites they make their plans from a nest of thatch. 
So I really miss the old birds, the ones I used to watch. 
Though the new ones might be colorful, they're simply not a match....

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Every Day with Sue

Every evening when day is done
your eyes are as the setting sun;
soothing, cooling; but still afire,
with a blazing flame I still admire.

Happy Anniversary, Sue.
33 years and counting....

Sunday, June 23, 2019

The Sun, the Moon and the Stars.

The moon and stars were talking one day,
The Sun was shining too bright.
He made them look dull some folks would say
So they banished him into the night.

The Sun didn't agree and hated his plight
So, he came up with a plan.
He'd rule the day and then sent them away,
To see what they could see without light.

And that is the reason why right to this day,
You never see them together.
While one is setting, the other one's rising,
and all agree it's been the for better......

--------------------------------------
Revised Version

The moon and stars were talking one day,
the Sun was shining too bright.
He made them look dull some folks would say,
so, they banished him into the night.

The Sun didn't agree and hated his plight
and so he refused to stay
Let them see what they could without light,
he thought as he turned them away.

And that is the reason why up to this writing,
you seldom see them together.
While one is setting, the other one's rising,
and all agree it's been for the better......

(For Sarah Ruth)

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Settled Law and a Living Constitution

We are often told that we have a "living" constitution. I am a moderate and agree with this assessment. After all, if it were not so, we would still be living with a permanent decision in the Dred Scott case. Nobody is in favor of that.

A "living" constitution has given us most of the freedoms we enjoy today. Many of them are bundled within the 14th Amendment, which is somewhat akin to placing all your eggs in one basket. But that's another story......

This year there has been a sea change in our society surrounding the Roe v Wade decision, which was made under the auspices of the 14th Amendment. Several states, almost half at this point, have passed new restrictions on abortion, leading the Pro Choice crowd to talk of "settled law."

While I am pro choice, I am also a Constitutionlist and a believer in a "living" Constitution. After all, it was this belief in a "living" Constitution upon which Roe v Wade was predicated and upheld.

Settled Law implies that once the Supreme Court decides an issue, then it's settled. Court nominees have had to convince Congress that they believe Roe v Wade to be settled law. I do not believe in "settled" law.

So, how do I merge both beliefs, which may seem to be in opposition to one another? Let's explore this.....

A Living Constitution implies that changes made by Amendment will apply as the people change and society grows.

Some people will be saying that the changes to abortion law are all part of a "living Constitution", and there is merit in that argument.

Others will opine that "Settled" Law means there can be no changes made to law after a Supreme Court decision has been rendered. There is also some merit to that view.

To really decide this issue you have to look at which changes by Amendment have been successful and which have not. You don't have to look very far for the example. It was the Volstead Act, the 18th Amendment in 1920. It was a failure and repealed by the 21st Amendment in 1933.

Here then, is the dilemma we face.

If we believe in settled law then we should still have slavery under Dred Scott, or Separate but Equal. Since "settled" law is not possible with an amendable Constitution, we don't have those things anymore.

So, we would have to say we don't believe in settled law. We believe in a "living" Constitution which changes with the needs of the people. (Notice I say "needs" and not "wants.")

People wanted Prohibition, just as they once approved of slavery. We are not populists. So, the "living" Constitution is capable of changing its mind, just as it did with the Volstead Act.

This may seem as being in agreement with a reversal of Roe v Wade under the 14th Amendment, but it wouldn't be true.

The big difference in all of this argument, and the point which most often goes unsaid, is that "settled" law has only always applied to our being granted more rights under the law.

The one time they tried to use the Bill of Rights, which is comprised of all 27 Amendments, to tell us what we could not do, was a failure and needed to be reversed.

Abortion is a right granted, not removed. As such, "settled" law is not contradictory to our "living" Constitution. It is compatible with it.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Pi Day

We all take Pi for granted. It’s loaded into our computers and calculators for us, and we use it in equations all the time without ever thinking of it beyond it's formulaic utility. Some years ago, while working as an estimator of utilities, I found it necessary; or maybe desirable; to understand the exact meaning of Pi and how it worked in relation to the circle.

Having failed at the subject all through high school, and even before that, I had this “fear” of math brought on by my parent’s assertions that I was not able to understand the subject. I was, like my mother; and remember, it was my mother who said it; used to tell me, “You take after me and I could never understand math. But you can read well, and your brother can’t.” What a stupid statement to make to any child, even your own! Water under the bridge. Having navigated around the world, by sextant, in the days before Nav Sats etc., I can truly say that I am perfectly capable of working out any mathematical problem thrown my way. The failure was in the teaching method.

Had they wanted to really engage my passion all they would have had to do was make the problems relevant to real life. Like, you are on a ship and headed in this direction for 8 days at so many mils per hour. How far have you gone? That would have got me interested. And by high school, rather than the mundane tasks of geometry and trigonometry, nautical astronomy would have proven more effective at teaching not only both of those subjects, but given the student a true perspective of just where we were on the terrestrial plane, and also how insignificant we actually are; individually, or collectively, in the grand scheme of things.

What is Pi? 3. 14159 is the most common answer. Then browse Wikipedia for what that means. Ask the “math” student in your family. The answers you get will all be concerned with the number rather than what it really means, or stands for. That was the purpose of charting it, as I did above, almost 40 years ago while estimating the volume of pipe necessary to hold a specific amount of water. I used a 6” pipe for the example, mostly because it was easily equated to decimal form, and I had a boatload of 6” pipe on hand.

But I kept running into Pi while figuring it out, and then rechecking my figures. So, I did what Captain Ellison used to tell us at the Baltimore School of Navigation; “Draw it out!” And, I did. And while putting some of my papers in order a few years ago; I actually did that; I ran across this and decided to post it for posterity.

In short, while Pi represents the factor used to determine the area within a circle, by careful calculation; and drawing the problem out; it becomes apparent that Pi actually represents .785% of the area of any circle. Will this change the world as we know it? I hardly think so. But it is an example of the beauty and perfection of numbers.

While I have rounded off the number to obtain this new factor, it should not pose any real problems for any calculations confined to construction, travel etc. Would I use it to build a spaceship and plan a trip to Mars? Hardly. But for the average needs of an estimator; or carpenter; this factor works out just fine.

I hope someone finds this useful and lets me know! Pi for now!

Note: Though I was able to find something about the factor .785 referenced on line; and one fellow even describes drawing a square with a circle inside the perimeters; I still find this explanation and diagram easier to follow.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Daffodils



See the pretty daffodils,
they grow in gardens;
grow on hills.

Unless the wind blows
they stand still;
like Guardians of the spring.

🌞


Photo by Sarah Ruth Williams - Chapel Hill, NC

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

"The Man Who Watched Trains Go By" with Claude Rains (1951)


Claude Raines plays a man who has been the head clerk/bookkeeper for 18 years at a firm in Holland. He lives by the sound of the train whistling to and from Paris his whole life, while he remains where he is.

A scandal at a rival firm leaves that firm bankrupt. But, though it has been proven the bookkeeper was innocent of any wrongdoing or knowledge of the crime by his boss, his life and career are ruined anyway. Even Claude cannot help him find a job.

Through a set of circumstances a police detective arrives from Paris tracing some Dutch currency which has been circulating in Paris on the black market. He comes to Claude's firm. The boss is most cooperative. Too cooperative.

Out walking one night, Claude finds his boss burning the books and running away with the firm's money. They struggle and the boss falls in the canal and drowns. The firm's money is strewn on the ground where it fell, along with a train ticket to Paris. What should he do about that? There are no more books, but keeping the money will make him guilty of embezzlement.  And leaving his family behind is not an option he really cares for. But this is an extraordinary situation.

What should he do? Tell the authorities the truth and risk disbelief and ruin? Or is there another way? And does that train whistle to Paris have an influence? Who can say?

Will he go to Paris so that it looks like his boss stole the money? Is it morally okay? After all, the boss was going to leave him holding the bag.....

Wonderfully adapted from the novel, and filmed in beautiful, almost muted color. This 1952 film stands the test. Also released as "The Paris Express".